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The concept of “food kilometers” is hardly new, but as the effects of human-induced climate change become ever more apparent, it’s worth examining how our food buying habits impact the natural environment. Broadly speaking, “food kilometers” refers to the distance food is transported from supplier to consumer, and are an important factor to consider when assessing the environmental impact of food choices.

Snowden Farms, a small-scale farm about 80 KM east of Toronto in Enniskellen, Ontario, produces non-GMO, free-range beef and poultry free of hormones and antibiotics. Farmer John Snowden employs the highest standard of animal care, raising his calves on site and feeding a natural grass and hay-based diet. 

As a small local farm, Snowden Farms uses fewer natural resources like fossil fuels, land and feed for transport and production compared to industrial animal farming operations, which have

 numerous harmful environmental effects.  When you buy from smaller, local farms, you support farming practices that emit fewer greenhouse gasses, prevent the clearcutting of land for the farming of animals and feed grains and support the preservation of the natural habitat and its native plant and animal species. 

And let’s not forget about the amount of plastics required for the packaging, preservation and transport of industrially produced foods. Shopping local means less waste and fewer plastics ending up in landfills.  

Snowden Farms, a small-scale farm
Healthy animals free of chemicals, hormones and antibiotics

 

John’s passion and love for his animals ensures high animal welfare, producing healthy animals free of chemicals, hormones and antibiotics. When buying local from local farms like Snowden Farms, you and your family get to enjoy high quality, nutritious food from a farmer you can trust – better for you and your family, and better for Mother Earth.

  If you’d like to learn more about food kilometers, visit https://www.sustainweb.org/publications/the_food_miles_report/ to download the full report from The Alliance for Better Food and Farming

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